Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Pet Accidents, What do you do?

You know your pet has had an accident on the carpet (or rug) because you can smell it. The quicker you can address the accident the better, so look for spots or discolorations. However, sometimes the accident is not visible, so what do you do then? A black light can be used. Darken the room, turn on the light and scan it over the floor. You will be able to identify the urine because the urine salts become fluorescent in the ultraviolet light. However, the most available and practical method is to use your nose. Don't be afraid to get down on your hands and knees to find it.

If the spot is still wet, blot, blot and blot some more to remove as much as possible. After blotting, you can sprinkle baking soda on the area. The baking soda will help absorb the urine and also neutralize the PH of the urine. (Note: baking soda may sometimes discolor fabrics, so you should test it on a non-conspicuous area of your carpet or rug). Let the baking soda dry on the spot then vacuum it up.

If the spot is dried up, then mix 1/3 white vinegar with 2/3 water and spray it on the spot. let it sit a little bit than remove the vinegar/water solution by blotting.

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Monday, September 18, 2017

Do It Yourself Spot Cleaning

You have an accident on your carpet and want to get it up. I do not recommend using something you buy from the store. These products tend to leave a residue that will attract dirt. Also, if it does not remove the spot, it could actually set the stain so a professional cannot get it out. I recommend using white vinegar and water. Mix around 1/3 white vinegar to 2/3 water in a spritz bottle, then spritz the spot and blot it up with a white rag.

Here is a link to a video that will show this process. Spotcleaning video

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Thursday, June 15, 2017

Have you ever noticed a grayish or dark line along the walls on your carpets?

     You probably do not want to know this, but it is not a defect in your carpet. It is called soil filtration and is a concentration of dirt that has collected on the carpet fibers.
     Soil Filtration is caused by positive and negative pressure within a building. What happens is, when pressure change occurs within a room from either the effect of warm air rising or from mechanical pressures, air tries to flow either in or out of the room. The carpet along the wall edges serve as a filter as the air exits or enters under pressure.

     Have you ever noticed a grayish or dark line at the doorway of a room? Once again, soil filtration. It is quite common for dirt and dust to accumulate under doors when they are shut. The supply air vent blowing air into the room creates positive pressure in the closed room. This air will seek areas of lower pressure (the return air vents) through the largest available holes. With the door shut, the undercut of the door is generally the largest available hole. Therefore, as the air passes between the door undercut and the carpeting, the carpet acts like a filter taking out dirt and dust particles from the air. Over a period of time, the carpet will darken as the dirt accumulates.
     Because soil filtration is a concentration of dirt particles, cleaning soil filtration areas can be very difficult.
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Friday, March 10, 2017

Why Vacuuming is So Important

When people ask me what is the best thing to do to take care if their carpets (or rugs), I tell them frequent vacuuming. Based on a Proctor and Gamble Company analysis of carpet soiling in the US, about 79% of dirt in a carpet is dry particulate. The compensation of this dirt is about 55% from "Tracked-In" gritty particles (like sand and fine dirt), 12% from animal fiber from people, pets and fabrics and another 12% from fibers, indoor plants, and tracked in organic material.

Because most of this dirt is brought in from outside of the home, you should vacuum at least a minimum of 2 times per week.

To really understand the importance of vacuuming, watch this video.

For more information on taking care of your carpets and upholstery, visit my website at