Friday, February 7, 2020

Sisal Rugs – The Do’s and Don’ts


Sisal Rugs are woven from natural plant fibers. They are strong, durable and due to their unique advantages, can be a lasting addition to a living room, bedroom, office or hallway.
However, sisal rugs do not like moisture and humidity. If a large amount of liquid is spilled on to the rug, the rug may actually shrink and distort. Also, the penetrating liquid can get absorbed into the sisal, resulting in a large stain. For this reason, a sisal rug should be used in a dry place which is unlikely to be subject to spills. It is also important to keep this in mind when you clean a sisal rug. Be very careful with the amount of liquid used.
If something is spilled onto a sisal rug, it needs to be removed immediately. To remove the liquid from a sisal rug, blot the rug with a dry cloth and keep blotting with dry parts until there is no more transfer of liquid to the cloth. Also, make sure not to rub the spill because this can drive the liquid into the fiber. If possible, you may find it helpful to lift the rug up and blot from the underside as well. If a staining liquid such as juice is spilled, clean a sisal rug with one-half white vinegar and one-half water solution. Dip a cloth in the solution, blot the rug, and then blot with a dry cloth. You may need to repeat this, but remember to use a small amount of water to clean a sisal rug so that the rug does not absorb the liquid. Even too much water can leave a stain.
For dry materials, you can scrape it off with a blunt edge, such as a wooden knife. Finally, the sisal rug should be vacuumed regularly to take up accumulated dirt. If you vacuum a sisal on a frequent basis, you will also prolong the life of the rug, since embedded dirt tends to damage its fibers.
For more information, visit my website at www.graysoncleans.com

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Tips on Rug Care


Whether you have expensive oriental rugs or just good everyday rugs, here are some tips to take care of them and make them last longer.

  • Vacuum rugs at least once a week.
  • Turn or rotate the ends of a rug.  This should be done once a year. However, it is a must to turn
    them at least every two years. Turning prevents more wear in one area than in another. It also helps to prevent “traffic patterns” from occurring as in carpeted rooms.
  • Moth considerations for wool and oriental rugs. Rugs regularly vacuumed or located in well used rooms are less likely to have moth damage. Moths work in secluded, undisturbed areas such as under beds, skirted sofas, or heavy furniture. Move furniture occasionally when vacuuming and clean under it. Also, homes not well ventilated or rooms closed for long periods of time are more likely to have moth problems, so once again vacuum rugs regularly.
  • Sunlight considerations. Direct, sunlight will gradually fade a rug. To avoid this, cover windows with drapes, curtains or shutters and use them to block strong morning and afternoon sunlight. Also, consider window glass treatments and rug treatments for UV light protection.
  • Plants or flowerpot considerations. Live plants requiring water should never be placed directly on rugs. Dampness from the bottom of the pots will cause mildew and rot, gradually destroying the fibers of the rug and resulting in drastic damage. Plants should be in a stand, preferably on wheels. Also, there should be a space between the pot and rug for air to circulate. Use a container under the flowerpot to avoid water dripping onto the rug.

For more information, visit my website at www.graysoncleans.com

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Carpet Care


Over time your carpets and rugs appearance deteriorates and becomes less attractive. This is due to abrasive soils becoming imbedded in your carpet or rug, which can cause damage to the fibers and reduce the carpet or rug’s life. Therefore, establish a regular maintenance schedule that includes professional cleaning.

Commandments of Carpet Care


  • Vacuum frequently and thoroughly. Most of carpet wear is caused by dirt. Oily soils attract more oily soil and frequent vacuuming will reduce soil buildup. Vacuum high-traffic areas daily, less traveled areas at least twice a week
  • Institute a no-dirt policy. A no-shoes rule is always effective, but can be difficult to implement. However, you should definitely make sure there are doormats at each entrance to your home. Clean the mats regularly so they don't become sources of soil themselves.
  • If furniture rests on the carpet, be sure it gets moved occasionally and use coasters under the furniture's legs.
  • Address stains quickly; the longer a stain chemically reacts with the carpet the harder it will be to remove it. Common stains usually don’t require any liquid cleaners stronger than water. Use as little water as possible and blot them clean instead of rubbing or brushing.

·         Bring professional cleaners in regularly. The commercial grade equipment we use gets the deeply imbedded dirt out and will make your carpet last longer. It is a good practice to have them cleaned every six months if you have children, and every 12 to 18 months if you don't.

For more information, visit my website at www.graysoncleans.com